Three more: Reynolds FEO-1, Conn 28D, Yamaha 561

By: frugalhorn

Apr 10 2017

Category: Uncategorized

1 Comment

Aperture:f/4
Focal Length:4.8mm
ISO:80
Shutter:1/125 sec
Camera:DMC-FZ35

Another Brushed NiSI Horn, This horn is a late Reynolds, near the end of brands name use. At this time F E Olds owned the name. Due to the fact that I’m working in the laundry room, the tools that were accessible in the root cellar need to be dragged to the porch to work. The old work shop was seriously flooded last summer. ( I hope to get it  repaired thsi sring/summer) The Brushed finish is done with a very fine 10″ steel wire Brush. The wheel is like I used to use when rust bluing rifles.

The over-all look is very similar to the old Conn sandblast finish used on their large tubas.The neat thing about it,  is you clean it with a green kitchen scrubbie. As you can see it’s squeaky clean on the inside. The valves have excellent compression. Note the oil port on the bearing lower shaft.I’ve enjoyed playing it in various venues, it plays very  well and would make a fine instrument for a serious re-emergent player or student, who doesn’t need a Drum & bugle corp high lacquer finish. The horn will have, not shown in pics, an adjustable pinky hook and a Durk adjustable pinky hook.

$ 1050.

YHR 561, with scratched/worn, less than attractive, lacquer. This horn has had a complete go through and plays a lot better than it looks. The branch coming out of #3 had become detached and has been cleaned up and re-soldered. The leadpipe has a repair at the bottom, see above.The back bow has signs of dent raising.  All in all, a good student horn, good enough to go to university as a music ed major’s horn. Probably not enough status for a horn performance major, but plays well, and in tune across the Bb F sides. $700.

and finally a Conn 28D.During shipping to me, it got a little “boink” , not only was the flare bent, but the lower half of the ring set was bent both out of round and out of flat. So a little later the bell flare was ironed out and the ring set adjusted. Now the horn is now up and running.The flare shows scars from its ‘trauma’ but…the horn, in its earlier life, has had some other work done to it. It has three “patches”.one at the thumb friction point, under the pinky hook, and another under the top “water slide”. You’ll also note  main tuning slide arch is an 8d replacement, NiSi. But not all news is repairs… It has two water keys, and a Conn-Selmer flipper. The ring-set, I think , is a Paxman set, it rides low on the flare. I don’t have a Paxman ring to check it with, but I’m not aware of another large set, except the one that Holton used on their marching mellophone. Because of the damage done to the lower ring, it is detachable, but when screwing it back up, caution must be used so as not to cross thread the threads. Finding the beginning point is crucial. Done carefully, not with the “look how fast I can put my horn together.” attitude. Finally, it is a Texas made 28D, It plays remarkably well. It is well centered, and has a huge bottom end. It has had enough work done to it, prior to showing up in my world, that someone thought highly enough of it to pay to have the work and other little custom features done to it. I’ve known several serious horn players who have played Texas horns. I know that many were problematic, but many are fine horns.  $1600.

If you know more than I, and many of you do, chime in to correct any short comings in my descriptions of the above horns. I’ve tried to keep prices reasonable, if you want to spend the big bucks, there are lots of places to do it…

Ask questions, shipping is generally in a functioning fixed bell case, in an 18 X 18 X 27 inch box weighing about 20 pounds,insured.  If you let me know your zip code I can come close on a ship/insured estimate.

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One comment on “Three more: Reynolds FEO-1, Conn 28D, Yamaha 561”

  1. Very interested in the Y 561 if still available. Shipping to 98105. Let me know.
    Rebecca

    Like


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